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princessstarr

Confessions of a Bibliophile

An aspiring writer and bookstore employee with an incredibly bad book-buying habit... I'll read just about anything (so long as it will appeal to my interests in some way), but my main loves are YA and sci-fi/fantasy. I also like quirky history and science books and will book nerd. A lot. Currently in the process of weeding out my personal library. Find me on Twitter @princess_starr or check out my YA book, Snowfall, on Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/240027
The Story of Cirrus Flux - Matthew Skelton So, I received this book through the Goodreads contest, mostly because the description looked interesting, and the title caught my eye. Sadly, what looked like a really fun read ended up as being a bit boring.The story concerns two orphans at a hospital for foundling children- Cirrus Flux and a girl named Pandora. Cirrus, who had been dumped there by his explorer father, is trying to get on without his best friend, Bottle Top, and meets a mysterious gentleman who has been watching him from the grounds. Meanwhile, Pandora finds herself employed by Madame Orrery, a mesmerist who has an interest in finding Cirrus. Pandora knows she needs to help Cirrus get away, not to mention, find his father's token that may hold the key to why so many people are interested in Cirrus.While the plot is good and I did like most of the characters, the book falls flat and seems really anticlimatic. Skelton never really explains his characters' motives or what his plot devices are used for. It seems like this is supposed to start a series, but the ending wraps up Cirrus's and Pandora's plotlines too neatly to continue. While the eighteenth-century London setting is engaging, it's hard to tell if this is supposed to be an outright fantasy (phoenixes and holograms are involved) or a historical adventure. The majority of the book is set up to discuss that the bad guys want Cirrus Flux and the sphere he owns, but there's never a reason given to why (outside of "I want power!") A plotline involving human dolls and electricity experiments only shows how different Cirrus and Bottle Top are and is promptly abandoned.If there was a mention of a continuing story, I would recommend to read this, because it is interesting story. Unfortunately, it seems like a stand-alone book, so unless you really like historical kids' fiction, I would pass this up.